7

ANNEXES
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
REFERENCES

ANNEX 1:

Results and milestones on the Every Woman Every Child journey, 2010-2015

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This annex draws on the series of technical papers written to inform the Global Strategy12 and on comments and reviews received in the course of public consultations. In addition, it is based on evidence syntheses previously conducted for a range of reports, including: Essential Interventions, Commodities and Guidelines for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (2012);78 the Global Investment Framework for Women’s and Children’s Health (2014);13 Every Newborn: an Action Plan to End Preventable Deaths (2014);20 Strategies Towards Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (2015);19 and Disease Control Priorities 3 (in preparation).79 This list of essential interventions should be seen as a “living resource” that should be adapted to different country contexts. It will be updated online at: www.everywomaneverychild.org as new evidence on high impact interventions and more effective delivery approaches become available.

Criteria for selection of interventions:

  1. Interventions that address major causes of morbidity and mortality for women, children and adolescents
  2. Interventions proven to be highly effective in improving the health and development of women, children and adolescents
  3. Interventions critical for the overall health and well-being of women, children and adolescents (e.g. interventions related to harmful practices and violation of human rights)

WOMEN (including pre-pregnancy interventions)

  • Information, counselling and services for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health including contraception
  • Prevention, detection and treatment of communicable and non-communicable disease and sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections including HIV, TB and syphilis
  • Iron/folic acid supplementation (pre-pregnancy)
  • Screening for and management of cervical and breast cancer
  • Safe abortion (wherever legal), post-abortion care
  • Prevention of and response to sexual and other forms of gender-based violence
  • Pre-pregnancy detection and management of risk factors (nutrition, obesity, tobacco, alcohol, mental health, environmental toxins) and genetic conditions

PREGNANCY (antenatal care)

  • Early and appropriate antenatal care (four visits), including identification and management of gender-based violence
  • Accurate determination of gestational age
  • Screening for maternal illness
  • Screening for hypertensive disorders
  • Iron and folic acid supplementation
  • Tetanus immunization
  • Counselling on family planning, birth and emergency preparedness
  • Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, including with antiretrovirals
  • Prevention and treatment of malaria including insecticide treated nets and intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy
  • Smoking cessation
  • Screening for and prevention and management of sexually transmitted infections (syphilis and hepatitis B)
  • Identification and response to intimate partner violence
  • Dietary counselling for healthy weight gain and adequate nutrition
  • Detection of risk factors for, and management of, genetic conditions
  • Management of chronic medical conditions (e.g. hypertension, pre-existing diabetes mellitus)
  • Prevention, screening and treatment of gestational diabetes, eclampsia and pre-eclampsia (including timely delivery)
  • Management of obstetric complications (preterm premature rupture of membranes, macrosomia, etc.)
  • Antenatal corticosteroids for women at risk of birth from 24-34 weeks of gestation when appropriate conditions are met
  • Management of malpresentation at term

CHILDBIRTH

  • Facility-based childbirth with a skilled birth attendant
  • Routine monitoring with partograph with timely and appropriate care
  • Active management of third stage of labour
  • Management of prolonged or obstructed labour including instrumental delivery and caesarean section
  • Caesarean section for maternal/ foetal indications
  • Induction of labour with appropriate medical indications
  • Management of post-partum haemorrhage
  • Prevention and management of eclampsia (including with magnesium sulphate)
  • Detection and management of women with or at risk of infections (including prophylactic use of antibiotics for caesarean section)
  • Screening for HIV (if not already tested) and prevention of mother to child transmission
  • Hygienic management of the cord at birth, including use of chlorhexidine where appropriate

POSTNATAL (mother)

  • Care in the facility for at least 24 hours after an uncomplicated vaginal birth
  • Promotion, protection and support of exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months
  • Management of post-partum haemorrhage
  • Prevention and management of eclampsia
  • Prevention and treatment of maternal anaemia
  • Detection and management of post-partum sepsis
  • Family planning advice and contraceptives
  • Routine post-partum examination and screening for cervical cancer in appropriate age group
  • Screening for HIV and initiation or continuation of antiretroviral therapy
  • Identification of and response to intimate partner violence
  • Early detection of maternal morbidities (e.g. fistula)
  • Screening and management for post-partum depression
  • Nutrition and lifestyle counselling, management of inter-partum weight
  • Postnatal contact with an appropriately skilled health-care provider, at home or in the health facility, around day 3, day 7 and at 6 weeks after birth

POSTNATAL (newborn)

  • Care in the facility for at least 24 hours after an uncomplicated vaginal birth
  • Immediate drying and thermal care
  • Neonatal resuscitation with bag and mask
  • Early initiation of breastfeeding (within the first hour)
  • Hygienic cord and skin care
  • Initiation of prophylactic antiretroviral therapy for babies exposed to HIV
  • Kangaroo mother care for small babies
  • Extra support for feeding small and preterm babies with breast milk
  • Presumptive antibiotic therapy for newborns at risk of bacterial infection
  • Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to manage babies with respiratory distress syndrome
  • Detection and case management of possible severe bacterial infection
  • Management of newborns with jaundice
  • Detection and management of genetic conditions
  • Postnatal contact with a skilled health-care provider, at home or in the health facility, around day 3, day 7 and at 6 weeks after birth

CHILD HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

  • Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months; continued breastfeeding and complementary feeding from 6 months
  • Dietary counselling for prevention of undernutrition, overweight and obesity
  • Responsive caregiving and stimulation
  • Routine immunization (including Haemophilus influenzae, pneumococcal, meningococcal and rotavirus vaccines)
  • Periodic vitamin A supplementation where appropriate
  • Iron supplementation where appropriate
  • Prevention and management of childhood illnesses including malaria, pneumonia, meningitis and diarrhoea
  • Case management of severe acute malnutrition and treatment for wasting
  • Management of moderate acute malnutrition (appropriate breastfeeding, complementary feeding; and supplementary feeding where necessary)
  • Comprehensive care of children infected with, or exposed to, HIV
  • Case management of meningitis
  • Prevention and response to child maltreatment
  • Prevention of harmful practices including female genital mutilation
  • Care for children with developmental delays
  • Treatment and rehabilitation of children with congenital abnormalities and disabilities

ADOLESCENT HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

  • Routine vaccinations (e.g. human papillomavirus, hepatitis B, diphtheria-tetanus, rubella, measles)
  • Promotion of healthy behaviour (e.g. nutrition, physical activity, no tobacco, alcohol or drugs)
  • Prevention, detection and management of anaemia, especially for adolescent girls
  • Comprehensive sexuality education
  • Information, counselling and services for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health including contraception
  • Psychosocial support and related services for adolescent mental health and well-being
  • Prevention of and response to sexual and other forms of gender-based violence
  • Prevention of and response to harmful practices such as female genital mutilation and early and forced marriage
  • Prevention, detection and treatment of communicable and non-communicable diseases and sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections, including HIV, TB and syphilis
  • Voluntary medical male circumcision in countries with HIV general
  • ized epidemics
  • Detection and management of hazardous and harmful substance use
  • Parent skill training, as appropriate, for managing behavioural disorders in adolescents
  • Assessment and management of adolescents who present with unintentional injury, including alcohol-related injury
  • Prevention of suicide and management of self-harm/ suicide risks


HUMANITARIAN AND FRAGILE SETTINGS

  • Develop and use a health and humanitarian risk assessments approach to identify priority needs and focus interventions
  • In the event of humanitarian emergency, ensure deployment of essential health interventions (included above). Adapt, implement and co-ordinate use of the minimum initial service package. Pay specific attention to interventions such as:
    • Sexual and gender-based violence prevention, contraceptives (short-acting and long-acting emergency contraceptives), post-exposure prophylaxis
    • Ensuring that policies and practices in emergencies and humanitarian crises promote, protect and support breastfeeding and other essential interventions for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health, based on context and need

This annex sets out specific areas of health systems policies and interventions that require the attention and leadership of country governments. The health systems policy areas for this Global Strategy build on the 2010 Global Strategy,1 the Essential Interventions, Commodities and Guidelines for Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (2012)78 and the accompanying policy guide for implementing essential interventions for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH): a multisectoral policy compendium (2014).80

To build health systems resilience, it is essential to strengthen emergency preparedness at all levels of the health system. This annex highlights the key components of emergency preparedness across the health system, drawn from the WHO manual “Strengthening health-system emergency preparedness”.55 This recommends that a Ministry of Health should: record and classify information regarding its capacity to manage crises; establish responsibility for specific tasks; determine the relationship between those involved in these tasks (partners, sectors, disciplines) with the aim of making best use of resources; identify shortcomings and gaps; and monitor progress.



HEALTH SECTOR INVESTMENT AREA

POLICY ON:

Constitutional and legal entitlements

  • Human right to the highest attainable standard of health
  • Universal access to health care and services, including sexual and reproductive health and rights

Human rights-, equityand gender-based approaches

  • Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health information, services and goods
  • Integrate human rights-, equity- and gender-based approaches into health sector policies and programmes
  • Improve the equity orientation of health information systems and their capacity to collect, analyse and report health inequality data

Strategies and plans

  • National strategy and scale-up plan for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health integrated into National Health Strategy and Plan
  • Prioritized and well-defined health targets and indicators for women, children and adolescents
  • Prioritized national and subnational annual implementation plans • Institutional arrangements for implementation and coordination across the health system

Financing

  • Adequate fiscal space for health generally and women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health specifically
  • Sustainable financing of women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health with effective and efficient use of domestic and external resources
  • Financing compacts between country governments and all major development partners
  • Annual tracking and reporting of total health expenditure by financing source, per capita; and total reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health expenditures by financing source and per capita

Human resources

  • National health workforce management plan
  • Adequate recruitment, training, deployment and retention of health personnel
  • Accreditation and certification of health personnel
  • Process and guidelines to authorize rational redistribution of tasks among health workforce teams (task shifting)
  • Adequate managerial and leadership capabilities at all levels of the health sector
  • Standards for supportive supervising of health personnel established and monitored

Essential health infrastructure

  • Plan for the establishment of new health facilities, based on need
  • Water, sanitation, electricity and safe disposal of medical waste in all health facilities
  • Functional health facilities well-equipped to deliver anticipated health services

Essential medicines and commodities

  • National list for the supply of essential medicines, commodities and equipment
  • Standards for procurement and distribution
  • Quality assurance and measures to maintain supplies at required levels

Service equity, accessibility and quality

  • Women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health services defined by level of health service delivery (primary, secondary or tertiary)
  • Equitable access to women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health services
  • Functional referral systems
  • Functional quality improvement and assurance mechanisms
  • Removal of financial barriers to accessing health services
  • Performance-based financing

Community capacity and engagement

  • Community participation in planning and monitoring of health services that ensures women and girls can fully participate and engages men and boys
  • Community engagement in learning programmes to increase health literacy and care-seeking behaviours
  • Inclusive community partnerships, including with local leaders, traditional healers, civil society and faith-based organizations
  • Support for community health personnel, including through favourable working conditions, incentives, skills development and supply of commodities and equipment

Accountability

  • Universal registration of births, deaths and causes of death
  • Functional health information system providing data disaggregated for age and gender
  • Systems of facility- and community-based maternal and perinatal death review and response, which are linked to subnational and national policy and accountability systems
  • Annual independent national and subnational women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health/health sector review
  • National accountability mechanism that is inclusive of all stakeholders and that recommends remedial action as required
  • Annual public sharing of information on commitments, resources and results by all stakeholders, at national, regional and international levels
  • Citizen participation in accountability with mechanisms for remedy and redress

Leadership and governance

  • Universal registration of births, deaths and causes of death
  • Functional health information system providing data disaggregated for age and gender
  • Systems of facility- and community-based maternal and perinatal death review and response, which are linked to subnational and national policy and accountability systems
  • Annual independent national and subnational women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health/health sector review
  • National accountability mechanism that is inclusive of all stakeholders and that recommends remedial action as required
  • Annual public sharing of information on commitments, resources and results by all stakeholders, at national, regional and international levels
  • Citizen participation in accountability with mechanisms for remedy and redress

Health workforce

  • A human resources framework for health-sector emergency management

Medical products, vaccines and technology

  • Dedicated medical supplies and equipment for emergency-response operations

Heath information

  • Information-management systems for risk-reduction and emergency-preparedness programmes
  • Information-management systems for emergency response and recovery
  • Risk communication strategies and mechanisms, within and outside the health system

Health financing

  • National and subnational strategies for financing health-sector emergency management

Service delivery

  • Response capacity and capability
  • Emergency medical services (EMS) system and mass casualty management
  • Management of hospitals in mass casualty incidents
  • Continuity of essential health programmes and services
  • Logistics and operational support functions in emergencies

Multisector policies and interventions are essential to achieving the aims of the Global Strategy and must therefore form part of national strategies on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. They should be monitored in the same way as health sector interventions, linked to corresponding SDG targets. Government leadership is required to ensure there is progress across sectors and to facilitate cross-sector collaborations where required. This Annex draws on the series of technical papers written to inform the Global Strategy12 and A policy guide for implementing essential interventions for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH): a multisectoral policy compendium (2014).78



SECTOR(S)

KEY POLICIES AND INTERVENTIONS

Finance and social protection

  • Reduce poverty, including through the use of gender- and child-sensitive cash transfer programmes designed to improve health
  • mplement social protection and assistance measures ensuring access for women, children and adolescents
  • Strengthen access to health insurance to decrease the impact of catastrophic out-of-pocket health spending, and to insurance related to other essential services and goods

Education

  • Integrate early child development interventions in child health services, childcare services and preschool education
  • Enable girls and boys to complete quality primary and secondary education, including by removing barriers that suppress demand for education
  • Ensure access to education in humanitarian settings and in marginalized and hard-toreach areas, including for individuals with disabilities

Gender

  • Promote women’s social, economic and political participation
  • Enforce legislation to prevent violence against women and girls and ensure an appropriate response when it occurs
  • Promote gender equality in decision-making in households, workplaces and communities and at national level
  • Prevent discrimination against women in communities, education, political, economic and public life

Protection: registration, law and justice

  • Strengthen systems to register every birth, death and cause of death and to conduct death audits
  • Provide protection services for women, children and adolescents that are age- and genderappropriate
  • Establish and enact a legal framework for protection, ensuring universal access to legal services (including to register human rights violations and have recourse to remedial action against them)

Water and sanitation

  • Provide universal access to safely managed, affordable and sustainable drinking water
  • Invest in education on the importance of safely managed water use and infrastructure in households, communities, schools and health facilities
  • Provide universal access to improved sanitation facilities and hygiene measures and end open defecation
  • Encourage implementation of sanitation safety plans

Agriculture and nutrition

  • Enhance food security, especially in communities with a high poverty and mortality burden
  • Protect, promote and support optimal nutrition, including legislation on marketing of breast milk substitutes and of foods high in saturated fats, trans-fatty acids, sugars, or salt

Environment and energy

  • Reduce household and ambient air pollution through the increased use of clean energy fuels and technologies in the home (for cooking, heating, lighting)
  • Take steps to mitigate and adapt to climate changes that affect the health of women, children and adolescents
  • Eliminate non-essential uses of lead (e.g. in paint) and mercury (e.g. in health care and artisanal mining) and ensure the safe recycling of lead- or mercury-containing waste
  • Reduce air pollution and climate emissions and improve green spaces by using lowemissions technology and renewable energy

Labour and trade

  • Expand opportunities for productive employment
  • Ensure gender equality
  • Enforce decent working conditions
  • Provide entitlements for parental leave and for childcare for working parents, and promote incentives for flexible work arrangements for men and women
  • Detect and systematically eliminate child labour
  • Create a positive environment for business and trade with regulations to protect and promote the health and well-being of individuals and populations

Infrastructure, information and communication technologies and transport

  • Build health-enabling urban environments for women, children and adolescents, through improved access to green spaces and walking and cycling networks that offer dedicated transit, safe mobility and physical activity
  • Develop healthy, energy-efficient and durable housing that is resilient to extremes of heat and cold, storms, natural disasters and climate change
  • Ensure that home, work and leisure spaces are accessible to people with disabilities
  • Ensure adequate health, education and work facilities and improve access by building roads
  • Provide safe transportation to health, education and work facilities, including during emergencies
  • Improve access to information and communication technologies, including mobile phones
  • Improve road safety, including through mandatory wearing of seat-belts and cycle and motorcycle helmets
  • Improve regulation and compliance of drivers, including introduction of a graduated driving licence that restricts driving options for inexperienced drivers

The United Nations Commission on Information and Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health reported to the United Nations Secretary-General in May 2011 making ten time-bound recommendations for 2012-2015.3 While much progress was made, several targets were missed.4,6 All the recommendations, with minor revisions, remain valid throughout 2016-2030 (the timeframe of the updated Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health). Below are the revised recommendations.

Better information for better results

  1. Vital events: By 2020, all countries have established a system for registration of births, deaths and causes of death and have well-functioning health information systems that combine data from facilities, administrative sources and surveys.
  2. Health indicators: By 2016, all stakeholders have agreed on ten measurable umbrella-level or global-level indicators on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health, disaggregated for gender and other equity considerations, to facilitate high-level political monitoring of progress towards the objectives of the Global Strategy. These political-level indicators would complement the much longer technical indicator list at the target level for the Global Strategy and the Sustainable Development Goals.11
  3. Innovation: Between 2016 and 2030, all countries integrate as appropriate new information and communication technologies (including e-health and m-health) into their national health information systems and health infrastructure.

  4. Better tracking of resources for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health
  5. Resource tracking: From 2016-2030, all countries track and report, at a minimum, two aggregate resource indicators: (i) total health expenditure by financing source, per capita; and (ii) total women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health expenditure by financing source, per capita.
  6. Country compacts: From 2016-2030, in order to facilitate resource tracking, “compacts” between country governments and all major development partners are in place that require reporting, based on a format to be agreed in each country, on externally funded expenditures and predictable commitments.
  7. Reaching women, children and adolescents: By 2020, all governments have the capacity to regularly review health spending (including spending on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health) and to relate spending to commitments, human rights, gender and other equity goals and results.

  8. Better oversight of results and resources: nationally and globally
  9. National oversight: By 2016, all countries have established national accountability mechanisms that are transparent, that are inclusive of all stakeholders and that recommend remedial action as required.
  10. Transparency: From 2016-2030, all stakeholders publicly sharing information on commitments, resources provided and results achieved annually, at both national and international levels.
  11. Reporting aid for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health: By 2017, a system is in place to capture, in a timely manner, all spending on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health by development partners.
  12. Global oversight: Starting in 2016 and ending in 2030, the Independent Accountability Group reports annually to the United Nations Secretary- General on the results and resources related to the Global Strategy and on progress in implementing this Commission’s recommendations.

The Commission reported to the United Nations Secretary-General in September 2012 and made ten recommendations to increase availability and access to 13 low-cost, high-impact life-saving commodities.5 While much progress has been accomplished already, these recommendations target longterm systemic and commodity-specific barriers, and so remain valid. Below are the recommendations, with minor revisions for the period 2016-2030 (the timeframe of the updated Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health).

Improved markets for life-saving commodities

  1. Shaping global markets: Effective global mechanisms such as pooled procurement and aggregated demand are in place to increase the availability of quality, life-saving commodities at an optimal price and volume.
  2. Shaping local delivery markets: Local health providers and privatesector actors are incentivized to ensure uninterrupted supply, distribution and appropriate production and promotion of essential life-saving
  3. commodities.
  4. Innovative financing: Innovative financing mechanisms, including results-based financing, are in place to rapidly increase access to lifesaving commodities by those most in need and to foster innovations.
  5. Quality strengthening: The number of manufacturers producing and marketing quality-certified and affordable life-saving commodities has increased.
  6. Regulatory efficiency: All countries have standardized and streamlined their registration requirements and assessment processes for live-saving commodities with support from regulatory authorities, the World Health Organization and regional collaboration.

  7. Improved national delivery of life-saving commodities
  8. Supply and awareness: All countries have improved the supply of life-saving commodities and built on information and communication technology (ICT) best practices for making these improvements.
  9. Demand and utilization: All countries, in conjunction with the private sector and civil society, have plans to implement at scale appropriate interventions to increase demand for and utilization of life-saving health services and products, particularly among underserved populations.
  10. Reaching women, children and adolescents: All countries are addressing financial barriers to foster equity and ensure the poorest and marginalized members of society have access to the life-saving commodities (including in fragile and humanitarian settings).
  11. Performance and accountability: All countries have proven mechanisms to ensure health workers are trained in the latest guidelines, with job-aids and checklists in place at the point of service to support effective delivery of essential interventions.

  12. Improved integration of private-sector and consumer needs
  13. Product innovation: Research and development (including policy and implementation research) to strengthen the pipeline of life-saving commodities, and bring successful innovations to scale, is prioritized, funded and commenced.
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On behalf of Every Woman Every Child, a multistakeholder Strategy and Coordination Group facilitated by the Executive Office of the United Nations Secretary-General oversaw production of this report, under the guidance of Amina J. Mohammed, United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Post-2015 Development Planning and supported by the Every Woman Every Child Health Team, led by Nana Taona Kuo.

The World Health Organization (WHO), on behalf of the H4+ Partnership, coordinated the content development and writing of the Global Strategy with several institutions and individual experts convened by Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director-General, Family, Women’s and Children’s Health, with Shyama Kuruvilla, Senior Strategic Adviser, as the focal point for the Writing Group. Marleen Temmerman, Director, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, coordinated the publication of a series of technical and strategy papers in The BMJ.

Every Woman Every Child extends grateful appreciation to the members of the Strategy and Coordination Group and the Writing Group who reviewed and commented on drafts of the report: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation: Mark Suzman, Timothy Thomas; China People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries: Yuan Xie; Executive Office of the United Nations Secretary- General: Hannah Sarah F. Dini, Megan Gemmell; Espolea, A.C.: Cecilia García Ruiz; Government of Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development: Diane Jacovella, Jo-ann Purcell, Christopher Armstrong; Government of Chile, Fondo Nacional de Salud: Jeanette Vega; Government of China, National Health and Family Planning Commission: Minghui Ren; Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare: C.K. Mishra, Anshu Mohan; Government of Norway, Ministry Of Foreign Affairs: Tore Godal; Government of Norway, Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation: Helga Fogstad, Austen Davis; Government of Tanzania, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare: Donan Mmbando, Neema Rusibamayila; Government of the United Kingdom, Department for International Development: Nick Dyer, Will Niblett; Government of the United States of America, United States Agency for International Development: Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Katherine Taylor, John Borrazzo, Hareya Fassil; GSM Association: Craig Friderichs; Innovation Working Group: Peter Singer; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS): Luiz Antônio Mateus Loures, Deborah von Zinkernagel; Merck for Mothers: Naveen Rao; Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): Jyoti Sanghera, Lynn Gentile; Partners in Population and Development: Joe Thomas; Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health: Robin Gorna, Andres de Francisco, Geir Lie, Lori McDougall; United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Financing the Health Millennium Development Goals and for Malaria: Raymond Chambers, Suprotik Basu; Her Royal Highness Princess Sarah Zeid; Save the Children: Jasmine Whitbread, Francesco Aureli; United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF): Geeta Rao Gupta, Kumanan Rasanathan; United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women): Yannick Glemarec, Nazneen Damji; United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA): Kate Gilmore, Laura Laski; United Nations Foundation: Kathy Calvin, Susan Myers, Anita Sharma; University College London, Institute for Global Health: Anthony Costello; White Ribbon Alliance: Betsy McCallon; World Bank: Timothy Evans, Agnes Soucat, Rama Lakshminarayanan; World Vision International: Kevin J. Jenkins, Martha Newsome. Writing Group consultants and support: Richard Cheeseman, Robert Taylor Communications; Joanne McManus, independent consultant; Julian Schweitzer, Results for Development; Allison Beattie, independent consultant; Anna Gruending, Marta Seoane Aguilo and Gabrielle Bunney, WHO; and Roberta Annovi, Annovi Design.

Every Woman Every Child also gratefully acknowledges the over 7,000 organizations and individuals who provided written comments and participated in Global Strategy consultations organized by The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health, the Governments of India, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates, as well as by the Partners in Population and Development inter-governmental network. It was further supported by discussions at the 68th World Health Assembly, the 41st G7 summit, and the 132nd assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union. A full description of the consultation process is available on www.everywomaneverychild.org.

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